Pinned post

The future of the academy depends on a shared commitment to scholarship - the cultivated habit of intentionally putting your core values into practice in every decision that shapes your work, from who you cite to what you study, from how you publish to how you recognize those whose labor supports your work. The measure of quality becomes then a matter of performative consistency: how well have you enacted the values about which you profess to care? We on the team wrote about this in an article on “The Transformative Power of Values-Enacted Scholarship” - nature.com/articles/s41599-020

This week marked an important milestone for the team: we were able to bring an amazing group of leaders at the University of Washington through the full story arc of the transformative work we hope to empower.

It begins with a reflective conversation about values that builds toward a values framework designed to inform every aspect of the work. We then deconstructed products of scholarship into their constitutive processes so we could identify ways to infuse our values into the micro-transactions that shape our work.

Then we invited colleagues to identify a meaningful change they want to make. We asked them to reflect on their positionality, the power they have to effect the change, and who they would need to enter into coalition with to be successful. We ended the workshop with four concrete areas of focus, a map of relationships that influence each area, and a set of values that will shape the way the coalition works together.

Chris Long boosted

I'm a professor of and Associate Dean in the area of at Michigan State University. My research areas are life writing, , , . We are transforming and pathways for through the Charting a Pathway to Intellectual Leadership model. Read more about it Change Magazine: doi.org/10.1080/00091383.2022.

The team is at the University of Washington this week doing a series of workshops on scholarship and institutional transformation.

Our work here in Seattle is based in part on our article entitled “The transformative power of values-enacted scholarship”

nature.com/articles/s41599-020

Chris Long boosted

If you're like me, then you were really happy to learn about Mastodon's enthusiastic support for image descriptions, and you were eager to join in.

Then you went to actually write something and realized you have no idea how to present visual info in a way that is helpful/enjoyable to those who are #VisuallyImpaired or #Blind.

I found this guide really informative: uxdesign.cc/how-to-write-an-im

Post-viral Edit: Don't forget to give the author some love on medium. They did the work!

#Accessibility

Chris Long boosted

Big shout out to Darius Kazemi (@darius). Who is he, you ask? Well, he *wrote* the fork of Mastodon we're using on hcommons.social (github.com/hometown-fork/homet), for one thing. But he's also a digital artist, a game programmer, an expert on federated systems, and someone actively trying to fix the internet (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darius_K). He's a big deal, really. But picture this: He gets an email from one of the thousands of clueless nerds trying to run a Mastodon server. He responds immediately, sets up a Zoom call, and takes the time to help us. It was a heroically kind thing to do, and @kfitz and I hope to pay it forward one of these days. Thanks again, Darius!

Chris Long boosted

Final call to apply for our Python Developer position! Our team at @CALMSU@twitter.com is looking for someone who is passionate about working with open source technologies and digital publishing systems. Apply here: careers.pageuppeople.com/782/c

Chris Long boosted

Hello hcommons.social! We're the Public Philosophy Journal, an open access, digital-only journal that offers an open forum for the curation and creation of accessible scholarship that deepens understanding of, deliberation about, and action concerning issues of public relevance.

We're passionate about open scholarship, working with communities, and fostering more sustainable and equitable scholarly publishing practices, especially around peer review. We're over at Michigan State University with @hcommons.social and @cplong.

All of our articles are open access and can be found on our website publicphilosophyjournal.org. We have some exciting stuff coming out in the near future.

Looking forward to the conversations we'll have with all of you here in the federated space. 👋

Chris Long boosted

long post on accessibility advice from a blind screen reader user 

OK #Mastodon. I've seen several toots on #accessibility for #screenreader users, however, I've not seen one from a screenreader user (as far as I know). I've used ZoomText, Outspoken, JAWS (AKA JFW), Supernova, NVDA (Windows), and VoiceOver (both on Macs and iPhone). I don't have experience with Windows Narrator or TalkBack. I would like to rectify and clarify a few small things.
First off, any awareness of accessibility issues, and endeavours to make things more accessible is great. Keep going!
But…
Blind/low-vision people have been using the internet as long as everyone else. We had to become used to the way people share things, and find workarounds or tell developers what we needed; this latter one has been the main drive to get us here and now. Over the past decade, screen readers have improved dramatically, including more tools, languages, and customisability. However, the basics were already firmly in place around 2000. Sadly, screen readers cost a lot of money at that time. Now, many are free; truly the biggest triumph for accessibility IMHO.
So, what you can do to help screen readers help their users is three simple things.
1. Write well: use punctuation, and avoid things like random capitalisation or * halfway through words.
2. Image description: screen readers with image recognition built-in will only provide a very short description, like: a plant, a painting, a person wearing a hat, etc. It can also deal with text included in the image, as long as the text isn't too creatively presented. So, by all means, go absolutely nuts with detail.
3. Hashtags: this is the most commonly boosted topic I've seen here, so #ThisIsWhatAnAccessibleHashtagLooksLike. The capitalisation ensures it's read correctly, and for some long hashtags without caps, I've known screen readers to give up and just start spelling the whole damn thing out, which is slow and painful.
That's really all. Thanks for reading! 😘

Quality of scholarship is wholly predicated on integrity of character.

The transformative power of scholarship lies in recognizing this dependency. When quality is divorced from ethical integrity - as it all too often is - the result is pervasive alienation.

Renewal and repair in depends on our capacity to align our policies and practices with this reality.

Show thread

One of the ways the structure of is said to differ from is the degree to which it is capable of cultivating discussion as opposed to broadcasting. What are the affordances and limitations of the federated model that lend themselves to or detract from the possibility of meaningful ? How might a culture of dialogue be cultivated and sustained?

Chris Long boosted

wonderful piece from Meredith Clark in part about how Black Twitter is not about Twitter

"The actions of one rich white man to upend the platform are a reminder that the promise of the internet as a democratized space is a bald-faced lie and a reflection of how everything built on racial capitalism can also be brought down by it."

thegrio.com/2022/11/03/elon-mu

Chris Long boosted

More on what happened later, but here's the tl;dr: we hit 100% disk usage and everything went kerflooey, and even after scaling up things would not restart. We restored a 6-hour old backup and things are back but a bunch of recent stuff is gone. Now to do a deeper investigation.

One of the many passages to which I regularly return in adrienne maree brown's book, "Holding Change," is this: "We need to pay attention to what we practice. Each practice of an organization is a small scale way to grow or shrink its own realization of its espoused mission and values" (Holding Change, 101).

The future of the academy depends on a shared commitment to scholarship - the cultivated habit of intentionally putting your core values into practice in every decision that shapes your work, from who you cite to what you study, from how you publish to how you recognize those whose labor supports your work. The measure of quality becomes then a matter of performative consistency: how well have you enacted the values about which you profess to care? We on the team wrote about this in an article on “The Transformative Power of Values-Enacted Scholarship” - nature.com/articles/s41599-020

I recently returned from Cape Town, South Africa where I participated in the 2022 Ubuntu Dialogues Conference. It was a transformative experience for me as a person and as a leader. Here is a video that captures something of the spirit of our time together: youtu.be/fWYhRB-qZpw

hcommons.social

hcommons.social is a microblogging network supporting scholars and practitioners across the humanities and around the world.